charlie's flybox

McFly Foam Egg


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step: 1
Pattern Description
Of all the patterns I tie, the egg fly is perhaps the most asked for demonstration. Getting the yarn to form a smooth, round ball can be a trick, and there are certainly a bundle of tricks to help this happen. First off, throw away your old Egg Yarn and get some of the new McFly Foam. McFly Foam is not foam at all, but a heavy nylon material with some stretch to it. The stretch allows the material to be bound tightly to the hook with a minimum of bulk. Also, forget about the old adage of using Kevlar thread for eggs...it just ain't needed anymore. The new GSP 50 (gel spun polyethylene) thread is nearly as small as 10/0 thread and every bit as strong as Kevlar. This thinner thread allows again, for the Mc Fly Foam to be bound tightly with little unneccesary bulk. Don't try triming these with your scissors either...use a razor blade, a nice, SHARP, new one...it makes a much cleaner finished egg and saves your scissors for real flies. I won't go into fishing eggs here, as this info is found elsewhere in the FlyBox, so you'll have to dig a little for it. Get some hooks and these materials and get to it...spring's a-comin'!
Materials Needed:

Hook: TMC 2488H #10-16.........................Thread: GSP 50, color to match the egg.............................Egg and Yolk: McFly Foam...............Special tools: Razor Blades
step: 2
Start the thread on the hook shank, immediately behind the hook eye. Wrap a thread base down the front half of the shank, then return the thread to the 25% point, that is, the middle of that thread base. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 3
Cut a large clump of McFly Foam from the bundle. You want more than you think you will need. It is much easier to get a dense egg with alot of material than with too little. Pull the ends of the clump so the bunch flattens out into a sheet somewhat. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 4
Lay a smaller strip of contrasting color McFly Foam atop the first big bunch for the yolk. This step is optional and allows for the off-colored yolk to show up on the finished fly. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 5
Lay this flattened bunch of McFly Foam on top of the hook shank with the center of it's length at the midpoint on the hook. Fold the foam around the hook so it encompasses the shank/closes in around it. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 6
Make two turns of thread over the center of the yarn clump. These turns are not tight yet, just draped one over the top of the other. Pull the ends of the yarn tight to compress it, allowing the thread wraps to sink down onto the shank. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 7
Pull the thread down tight, compressing the yarn as tightly as possible against the shank. Make another tight turn over the first two. It is imperative that the thread wraps be one on top of the other here with no travel. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 8
Pull the yarn up at the front of the fly so it parts around the hook eye cleanly. You don't want the yarn to twist around the shank as you tie, it should pull up on either side of the hook shank as shown. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 9
Grab the whole bundle of McFly Foam and pullit all up above the shankas tight as you can. Do not twist the yarn here. I have pulled it to the far side here in this photo to illustrate the tie down on the bottom. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 10
Now, holding the yarn in your thread hand, and the bobbin in your material hand, bring the thread up on the far side of the hook around the back of the clump and bring it down on the near side. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 11
Continue wrapping forward with the thread, up over the hook shank in front of the yarn clump charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 12
...and around the backside once again. These wraps are compressing the yarn from front to back on the hook, so it takes up very little shank length. Don't go crazy with the number of turns, just make sure they are tight. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 13
Bring the thread around to the front of the yarn clump once again in preparation for tying off. Whip finish the thread and clip it here. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 14
You ought to have something that looks a little like this... charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 15
Pull the yarn up tight on the top of the hook. Don't twist it here, just pull straight up. Use a sharp razor blade to begin cutting from the back to the front. Ultimately, you are trying to cut a half circle shape in the yarn, so start low... charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 16
Peak the cutting motion at the center of the clump, then start to slide back down toward the hook eye. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 17
Finish the cut by rounding down toward the hook eye as shown here. You don't need to hold the yarn and the balde in the same hand unless you are trying to snap the shutter like I was;-) charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 18
Should come out nice and round like this, right? charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 19
top view charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 20
bottom view charlie's flybox
charlies flybox