charlie's flybox

Two Bit Hooker


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step: 1
Pattern Description
The Two Bit Hooker (formerly known as Beanie May) has been in the works for quite some time. For a couple seasons now, I have been trying to come up with a small, heavy fly that doesn't have a disproportionately large bead or weight stuck on it. Mike Mercer's MicroMay is a great pattern and I have caught tons of fish on it in the last few years, but that damn oversized bead just looks so out of place on a small, slender fly! After months of tinkering, it finally occurred to me that it would be a good idea to use TWO small beads rather than one large bead...DUH! What I have done here is used two 1.5 mm tungsten beads, one hidden in the thorax of the fly and the other placed like a traditional bead head, albeit much more streamlined because of it's small size. These tiny beads are proportioned to these small hooks and when added together make three millimeters of tungsten bead...which spells out H-E-A-V-Y!! I finally got it, not it's your turn to try the best small dropper fly ever.
Materials Needed:

Hook: TMC 921 #14-18............................... BeadS: 1.5mm Copper (Brass or Tungsten), two of them................ Thread: 14/0 or 10/0 Brown............................. Tail: Mottled Brown India Hen Back fibers........... Abdomen: Brown tying Thread.................... Rib: Black 14/0 Tying thread.......................... Wingcase: Medium Opal Mirage Tinsel.............. Thorax: Rusty Brown Superfine Dubbing.............. Legs: Mottled Brown India Hen Back fibers........... Coating: 5 Minute Epoxy.
step: 2
Pinch the hook barb (so the small beads will fit over the barb) and slide two 1.5 mm tungsten (or brass if you're cheap;-) beads onto the hook. Slide the beads up to the eye and start the thread behind the second bead. Wrap a smooth thread base back to the bend. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 3
Even the tips of four hen back feather fibers by pulling them out at a right angle to the stem of the feather. Strip the fibers from the stem, measure them against the shank so they are one half a shank length long and tie them in at the bend of the hook. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 4
Wrap forward over the butt ends of the tail fibers to the beads and clip the excess tailing. Tie in a six inch length of black 14/0 thread at the back of the bead on either the top or the near side of the hook. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 5
Wrap back over the black thread to the bend of the hook, then return the thread to the back of the beads, building a slight taper as you go. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 6
Spiral wrap the black thread rib forward over the abdomen up to the back of the bead and tie it off with a couple turns of thread. Clip the excess black thread. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 7
Move the thread back over the front of the abdomen to approximately the 50/50 point on the shank. Tie in a piece of medium Opal Mirage tinsel so it lies flat on the top of the fly at the fifty-fifty point. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 8
Dub the thread with a VERY thin strand of dubbing and build a small ball, about the same diameter as the bead, from the fifty percent point to just short of the back edge of the bead. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 9
Reach in with your fingernail and slide the second bead back tight to the front edge of the dubbing ball. Jump the dubbed thread forward over the bead to the space between the beads. The thread should cross across the bottom of the bead to help hide this bead in the thorax. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 10
Make several light turns of dubbing between the beads to build the shank diameter up a bit. It doesn't need to be as big as the beads are, but close to that is about right. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 11
Peel a generous clump of hen back fibers from the feather as you did with the tail, again, making sure the tips are even. I try to keep these fibers laying parallel to one another in a "sheet". charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 12
Use the tips of your scissors to divide this "sheet" of fibers equally in half. Keep the fibers pinched in the tips of your thread hand fingers, just use the scissors to separate the bunch as shown. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 13
Now, place the sheet of fibers on the top of the shank with one half the fibers on either side of the shank. I like to tilt the fibers slightly toward me a bit to counter-act the thread torque when I tie them down so they stay centered. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 14
Measure the tips of the hen fibers so they reach back to about the hook point, then grab them with your material hand and hold them in place on either side of the hook (keeping them slightly off center toward you). charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 15
Now, without removing your fingers from the fibers (I HAD to here to show the step) make a wrap over the hen fibers to bind them down behind the first bead. The thread torque should pull them a bit to center them on either side of the thorac. Anchor the fibers in place with several more tight turns of thread. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 16
If needed, pull the butt ends of the bibers evenly to shorten the legs. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 17
Carefully clip the butt ends of the hen fibers as close to the bead as you can. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 18
Pull the Mirage Flash over the top of the thorax and tie it down tightly with two turns of thread. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 19
Pull the remaining butt end of the flash back over the top of the fly and bind it in place again with another couple of tight thread turns. Folding the flash like this really anchors it down. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 20
Whip finish the thread and clip it. Now, nick the edge of the flash with the tips of your scissors and tear the flash across the top of the fly, rather than just cutting it off. Nicking it will make it tear along the radius of the bead and make a clean smooth edge. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 21
Place a drop of 5-Minute epoxy on the back of the fly, coating from the back edge of the front bead all the way back to the bend of the hook and base of the tail. Only coat the top surface of the fly, don't go down around the sides I only use epoxy to coat flies nowadays...Loon's UV Knot Sense has proven unreliable and comes off the fly too easily. Go to the extra bit of trouble now so you don't have to re-do it later;-) charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 22
Top View. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 23
Bottom View. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 24
Side View. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox