charlie's flybox

Eastern European Woven Grub


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step: 1
Pattern Description
I originally did this pattern tutorial to show the technique for making the famous Polish Woven Nymph, but got a little confused as to exactly what weave was used for the originals. The weave I use here is called a Potts Weave, from Franz Potts, and can be applied to a bunch of different patterns to create a stripe on the belly of the fly. One of the most unique uses for this weave has to be the old Tucker Scud. Mike Tucker used his Liqui-Lace and ostrich herl in this weave to create one of the best looking scud patterns ever. Play with this technique a bit and you'll find a bunch of applications too. As for the Eastern Euro Woven Nymph, after further review, I discovered that this weave, as well as several others, have been used to tie this unusual pattern in the recent years. This pattern can imitate a caddis larvae, cranefly, scud or general grub with equal aplomb. Give this one a try, if merely to test your skills...
Materials Needed:

Hook: TMC 2457 #8-18 Thread: 70 Denier Black or to compliment overbody Weight: Lead wire Body: Four Strand floss (Brown) woven with three strands of orange embroidery yarn Beard: Black Hen Saddle hackle Fibers Coating: Sally Hansen's Hard As Nails
step: 2
Begin by wrapping about twenty turns of lead wire around the shank at the center of the hook. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 3
Start the thread and build a taper up from the bare shank onto the lead at the front of the hook. Continue wrapping a smooth thread base over the lead back to the end of the lead wraps and taper the thread base back down onto the bare shank at the bend. Return the thread to the index point. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 4
Tie in the four strand brown floss at the back of the index point on the top of the hook shank. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 5
Wrap back over the floss to the bend of the hook, keeping it along the top of the shank as you go. Return the thread to about two eye lengths back from the eye. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 6
Tie in the three strands of embroidery yarn on the bottom of the shank starting at about two eye lengths back from the eye. Pull down on the embroidery floss as you wrap the thread over it back to the bend charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 7
Be sure the embroidery floss stays along the underside of the hook as you wrap over it. Return the thread to the index point with smooth, even turns to preserve the smoothly tapered underbody. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 8
Whip finish the thread at the rear edge of the index point to secure it, but do not trim the tying thread. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 9
Pull the bobbin down and set it on your tying table off to the front side of the shank, as shown. This will keep the bobbin out of the way during the weaving process. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 10
To begin, tilt the hook in the vise, exposing the back of the hook to clear a little working room. Grasp all four strands of the brown floss in your thread hand and make a single turn over the top of the hook at the bend. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 11
While holding the brown floss between the thumb and forefinger of your thread hand, reach over with the middle finger of your thread hand and catch the orange floss. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 12
Pull the orange floss forward on the underside of the hook. It should also be under the brown floss at this point, as shown. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 13
Pull the orange floss tightly forward, then grab it in your material hand and bring it back over the top of the brown floss, and pull it tightly toward the back of the hook. This all sounds complicated, but all you are doing is wrapping the orange floss around the brown. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 14
While holding the orange floss to the rear of the hook, make another single turn over the top of the hook with the brown floss. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 15
Pull back and then down on the orange floss to tighten the wrap... charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 16
...then place the tip of your material hand index finger on top of the fly to hold the wrap in place. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 17
Repeat the weaving process one more time. The rest of the fly is constructed of the same maneuvers. To reiterate the process: Start with one turn of brown floss over the top of the hook, not all the way around. The brown floss should be on the far side of the hook, approaching the bottom near side. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 18
Bring the brown floss toward you then reach under it with your fingertip to catch the orange floss. Pull the orange floss under the brown toward the front of the hook. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 19
Transfer the orange floss to your material hand and pull it over the top of the brown floss and straight back in line toward the bend. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 20
Hold the orange floss tight as you make another turn over the top of the hook with the brown. Repeat the process until you reach the back edge of the index point. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 21
Once at the index point, carefully reposition the hook in the vise so gravity is now working for you again, reel in the extra thread from the bobbin, and tie off the brown floss. The orange floss can dangle here as it is held in place by the brown. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 22
Pull the orange floss forward on the underside of the hook and tie it off at the back edge of the index point. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 23
Clip the excess brown and orange floss flush against the hook shank at this point. Make a few turns of thread to cover the stub ends. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 24
Invert the hook in the vise. Peel a clump of black hen saddle feathers from the quill and measure them against the hook so their tips extend to the point of the hook. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 25
Pinch the hackle fibers in place and tie them down on the underside of the hook at the rear edge of the index point. Clip the butt ends of the hackle fibers as close to the shank as possible. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 26
Replace the hook in the vise with the point down again and build up a smooth, slightly bulbous thread head. Whip finish the thread at the eye and clip it. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 27
You can leave the fly un-coated, or put a couple light coats of Sally Hansen's Hard As Nails over the brown floss and black thread head to increase the durability. The nail polish coating really gives the fly a nice sheen and strengthens the four-strand floss over body considerably. charlie's flybox
charlies flybox
step: 28
Finished Fly, side view. The orange floss should form a stripe across the bottom of the fly. It is not uncommon for the stripe to be slightly toward your near side of the hook, so if yours is, don't sweat it. Just remember to fish this particular fly along the right bank ;-) charlie's flybox
charlies flybox